Living in this world; outrage at evil or seeing the Good of God?

Friends – all three of you! –  I thought I’d share a passage mentioned in the introduction to a translation of a short treatise the great sage and master, ibn al-‘Arabī of Andalusia, wrote to an aspirant. He seems to in some way, renounce the world and somewhat subvert traditional ideas on wayfaring (from what I gather), but this is a subject for another discussion.

I quote a short passage from the introduction, wherein ibn al-‘Arabī mentions his encounters with one of the elite sages and saints of God, one of the ‘abdāl’ about which he wrote extensive passages (as I understand it), in his most major text, the Futuḥāt al-Makkiyya – The Meccan Openings, and their cosmological roles.

Here is an encounter he had with one of them: [from ‘The Four Pillars of Spiritual Transformation,’  trans. Stephen Hirtenstein, (Oxford: Anqa Publications, 2008) pp 14-15]

“Apart from his own personal meetings with such saints, he also relates three incidents regarding other people that he personally knew and one of the abdāl: one as a part of this treatise, which involved one of his companions in al-Andalus…and twice in his Futūḥāt. The Futūḥāt meetings shed further light on the elevated degree of these men of God, who exhibit apparently miraculous powers:

‘I once met one of the wandering pilgrims on the sea-coast between Marsā Laqīṭ and the light-house [near Tunis]. He told me that on the same spot had he come across one of the abdāl walking upon the waves of the sea. He said: “I greeted him and he returned my greeting. This was a time of great injustice and oppression in the country, so I asked him what he thought of all the terrible things that were happening in the country. He glared at me angrily and said: “What is it to you or to God’s servants? Don’t speak of anything but that which is good! May God grant you help and accept your apology for this.”‘

I wonder, then, if this is a way (and I do recommend the text) if the Great Shaykh tells us to try to look past the apparent tragedy and carnage, but simultaneously to find ourselves less attached to the world and its outcomes? We may not need a Benedict Option, if in one way or another we are able to connect ourselves to the Divine through a process of gradual renunciation through some spiritual rigours? What say you? Do we need to be perpetually on-edge due to geopolitical or local concerns, or should we place our trust – though this is a matter of Grace – somewhere else? Someplace…Higher?